Blog Nutrition Flax Seeds Benefits: 10 Reasons Why You Should Eat This Superfood

Flax Seeds Benefits: 10 Reasons Why You Should Eat This Superfood

Flaxseeds are tiny seeds that come from the flax plant. This plant belongs to the Linaceae family, which also includes the common weed plantain. The word “flax” is believed to originate from the Latin word “floccus,” meaning a wool-like thread, due to the nature of its fibers. These seeds are often referred to as a superfood because of their nutritional profile. It makes them a popular ingredient in many recipes.

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Flax Seeds Nutrition Facts

According to the USDA, one tablespoon of ground flax seeds contain (10):

 

  • Calories: 37
  • Protein: 1.3 grams
  • Carbs: 2 grams
  • Fiber: 1.9 grams
  • Total fat: 3 grams
  • Saturated fat: 0.3 grams
  • Monounsaturated fat: 0.5 grams
  • Polyunsaturated fat: 2.0 grams
  • Omega-3 fatty acids: 1,597 mg
  • Vitamin B1: 8% of the RDI
  • Vitamin B6: 2% of the RDI
  • Folate: 2% of the RDI
  • Calcium: 2% of the RDI
  • Iron: 2% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 7% of the RDI
  • Phosphorus: 4% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 2% of the RDI

flax seeds benefits for female

Benefits Of Flax Seeds

Here are ten flax seed health benefits that make them stand out from all other superfoods:

Rich In Fiber

Flaxseeds contain high amounts of dietary fibers, which help improve the health of your digestive system. Fiber is essential for proper bowel movements and can relieve symptoms like constipation, diarrhea, hemorrhoids, and bloating (7). A study also showed that people who consumed more dietary fiber had a significantly lower risk of developing diverticular disease (1). 

Excellent Source Of Healthy Fats

Healthy fats play an important role in the health of our body. They help us absorb essential nutrients, support cell growth, and protect our organs. Flaxseeds are an excellent source of healthy fats, especially omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids have been linked to a variety of health benefits like improving heart health, reducing inflammation, and preventing chronic diseases (11). 

High In Lignans

Lignans are plant compounds that have powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Flaxseeds are one of the richest sources of lignans. These compounds can reduce your risk of developing cancer by blocking the effects of estrogen and other cancer-causing agents (11). 

Good Source Of Protein

Protein is an important nutrient that plays a vital role in the growth and repair of our cells. It can also help us feel full after a meal, which is important for weight loss. Flaxseeds contain about 1.3 grams of protein per tablespoon, making them an excellent source of this nutrient (10). One study found that consuming flaxseed increased the levels of satiety hormones like peptide YY and cholecystokinin (CCK), as well as reduced appetite and food intake (2).

flax seeds benefits for female

Read More: Flaxseed Recipes For Weight Loss: 6 Simple Ways To Use This Superfood

High In Antioxidants

Flaxseeds are rich in antioxidants like vitamin E and selenium. They help neutralize free radicals that damage cells and cause inflammation, which may eventually lead to heart disease and other chronic conditions like obesity and cancer. Studies show that flaxseeds can reduce inflammation in people with metabolic syndrome (2). 

Boosts Immunity

Flaxseeds are a good source of magnesium, which is an essential mineral for the proper functioning of our nervous system. It also plays an important role in regulating blood sugar levels and reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and migraine headaches. Magnesium deficiency is associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and other chronic conditions (9). 

Balances Hormones

Flaxseeds contain high amounts of lignans which play a vital role in balancing hormones like estrogen and progesterone hormone levels. Lignans act as phytoestrogens (plant-based estrogens), which means they can mimic the effects of estrogen in the body. This can help reduce the risk of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other hormone-related diseases (2). 

Regulates Blood Sugar Levels

Flaxseeds are a good source of fiber and magnesium, both of which help regulate blood sugar levels. Fiber slows down the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, while magnesium helps improve insulin sensitivity. A study showed that people with type 2 diabetes who consumed flaxseed powder had a significant reduction in blood sugar levels and HbA1c (a marker for long-term blood sugar control) (2).

flax seeds benefits for female

Lower Cholesterol Levels

Flaxseeds contain high amounts of dietary fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, both of which have been found to reduce blood cholesterol levels. One study revealed that people who consumed flaxseed powder daily for three weeks had a significant reduction in their total cholesterol and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels (2). 

Promotes Weight Loss

Due to its high dietary fiber content, flaxseeds can help promote weight loss by improving gut health and making you feel full longer. Fiber also helps improve blood sugar control, which is important for reducing your risk of several chronic diseases associated with obesity. In one study, women who ate about three tablespoons of milled flaxseed lost 65 percent more fat from their waists during a 12-week period than those who didn’t consume any flaxseed (2). 

Prevents Constipation

Constipation is a common problem that affects people of all ages. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including a low-fiber diet, dehydration, and lack of exercise. Flaxseeds are a good source of fiber, which can help relieve constipation and other digestive problems (2).

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flax seeds benefits for female

How To Use Flax Seeds As An Ingredient

Flax seeds or flaxseed oil can be added to many common foods. Try the following:

 

  • Drizzling flaxseed oil as a dressing on a salad 
  • Adding them to water and drinking daily
  • Adding flaxseeds to soups and stews
  • Mixing flaxseed meal with fruit smoothies 
  • Mixing flax seeds in yogurt 
  • Adding them to water as an egg substitute
  • Adding them to meat patties 
  • Adding ground flaxseed to baked goods
  • Sneaking them into mashed potatoes by blending the seeds in a blender

Tips For Adding Flax Seeds To Your Diet

Here are some tips for getting the many health benefits of these seeds:

Consume Ground Flax Seeds Rather Than Whole

Ground flax seeds  are more easily digested than whole seeds. They also offer the same benefits as whole flaxseeds, including high amounts of fiber, heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, and cholesterol-lowering phytochemicals (2). 

Flaxseed Oil Has A Very Strong Flavor

Flaxseed oil is pale yellow in color and has a strong nutty flavor that may not appeal to everyone. You can mix it with soy or walnut oil before adding it to foods for an improved taste. Flaxseed oil contains very little (about 2 percent) lignans, which provide its health benefits. For optimal health benefits you need about 50 grams of ground flaxseeds per day, which is difficult to achieve without taking a supplement (10).

Read More: Delicious Chia Seeds Recipe – Weight Loss Meals To Try Today

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Bursting The Flax Seeds Is Key To Unlock Their Nutrients

In order for flaxseeds to offer their full health benefits, they must be ground up or “broken.” Most whole seeds will pass through your digestive system mostly intact and without releasing their nutrients. In order to get the most from these seeds, you need a powerful high-speed blender that can break open the seeds and release the lignans inside. Your body then absorbs these phytonutrients much more readily than it would with whole flaxseeds. 

The Nutrients In Flaxseed Oil Are Heat Sensitive

Like all oils, flaxseed oil is heat sensitive and should not be cooked at high temperatures. It’s best to add it to foods after they have been cooked or use it as a cold dressing. 

Store Flaxseeds In The Refrigerator Or Freezer

Once flaxseeds are ground, they spoil quickly and can go rancid. For this reason, it’s best to store them in the refrigerator or freezer. 

Mix Them With Other Ingredients For Added Health Benefits

Flax seeds don’t have to be consumed on their own to offer health benefits. You can mix them with other ingredients to create healthful dishes that are both delicious and nutritious. For example, try adding them to a bowl of oatmeal, a green salad, or a smoothie.

flax seeds benefits for female

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Flax Seed Side Effects

Dry flax seeds are usually well-tolerated, and allergy is rare. Still, it’s recommended to drink plenty of water when eating these seeds. Some of the health effects of consuming too much of these seeds are:

Impaired Thyroid Function

Flax seeds naturally contain plant compounds called cyanogenic glycosides. These compounds can bind with sulfur compounds in your body to form thiocyanates that impair function of your thyroid glands (6). Moderate portions are highly unlikely to cause any adverse effects in healthy individuals. However, those with thyroid problems should consider avoiding high amounts of flax seeds. 

Poor Absorption Of Minerals

Overconsumption of flax seeds can also lead to poor absorption of minerals from food. This is because of the high levels of phytic acid  in flaxseeds bind to minerals like zinc, iron, and calcium, making them unavailable for absorption. Phytic acid is a naturally occurring compound that can also be found in other plant foods like grains, legumes, and nuts (8).

Constipation And Diarrhea

Consuming large amounts of flaxseeds can cause constipation and diarrhea in some people. If this occurs, reduce your intake and drink plenty of fluids (3). 

Phytoestrogens Risks During Pregnancy

Flax seeds and flaxseed oil naturally contain compounds called phytoestrogens that can mimic estrogen in your body. Although these plant-based estrogens are much weaker than the estrogen found in birth control pills, experts still recommend consuming them with caution during pregnancy. There is some concern that they may disrupt hormonal balance and increase the risk of lower birth weight (5). 

Blood Thinning Effects  

Flaxseeds and their oil naturally contain Omega -3 fatty acids that when consumed in large doses, can act as blood thinners. It’s still unknown if this effect is large enough to cause problems such as excessive bleeding, but it’s best to be cautious by avoiding flax seeds and flaxseed oil if you’re already on blood-thinning medication or have a bleeding disorder (4). 

The Bottom Line

Flax seeds are a nutrient powerhouse that offer a variety of health benefits. They are especially high in fiber, lignans, and Omega-3 fatty acids. Although they have some potential side effects when consumed in large amounts, these seeds are generally well-tolerated and safe for most people to eat. So go ahead and add them to your next meal!

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DISCLAIMER:

This article is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional advice or help and should not be relied on to make decisions of any kind. Any action you take upon the information presented in this article is strictly at your own risk and responsibility!

SOURCES:

  1. Dietary fibre intake and the risk of diverticular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies (2019, nih.gov)
  2. Flax and flaxseed oil: an ancient medicine & modern functional food (2014, nih.gov)
  3. Flaxseed: Uses, Side Effects, Dose, Health Benefits, Precautions & Warnings (2021,emedicinehealth.com)
  4. FLAXSEED (n.d., webmd.com)
  5. Flaxseed and Flaxseed Oil (2020, nih.gov)
  6. Flaxseed-a potential functional food source (2014, nih.gov)
  7. Health benefits of dietary fiber (2009, pubmed.gov)
  8. Reduction of phytic acid and enhancement of bioavailable micronutrients in food grains (2013, nih.gov)
  9. Review: Subclinical magnesium deficiency: a principal driver of cardiovascular disease and a public health crisis (2018, nih.gov)
  10. Seeds, flaxseed (2019,usda.gov)
  11. The benefits of flaxseed (2016, usda.gov)
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